The morning after the Dec. 6 storm

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Summer of ’13 playlist

I’ve added a “make a playlist” habit on Lift. Mixtapes always bring me joy, so I think making a habit out of this will help me with my happiness issues. This one is mostly modern indie with a classic twist (you know, those bands that either deliberately or accidentally sound like they’re from the 70s). And The Clash, who actually were from the 70s. There’s also a bit of a reggae theme.

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Rethinking my GTD strategy

I’ve been using Evernote since 2006. The combination of checkboxes and their searchability with the “todo:” search operator allowed me to manage my GTD workflow in a particular manner. Other third-party solutions, such as Zendone, utilized notes as to-do items, ignoring built-in checkboxes altogether. But then when Evernote released a new “Reminders” feature, they piggybacked on it by making the reminders behave as to-do lists, with their own checkboxes, completely separate from the ones in notes. This was a little problematic, as it creates serious fragmentation in your workflow. Perhaps it can be used for “focus” items. I didn’t like the old checklists, but I used them. I like the new checklists, but the fact that they can’t be correlated with the existing ones makes a transition difficult, and though reminders are supported in the API, they are not supported in the free-text search syntax or saved searches, both of which I use in my regular workflow. (Another area of fragmentation is that Reminders aren’t available in the Windows version.)

Enter Springpad. The only way you can enter a checklist is as a separate note type (just like in Google Keep). I don’t have a workflow planned up yet, but I’m starting to get some ideas. I also like the “comments” feature, and though this is used in so many modern platforms (blogs, Facebook, G+, etc.), because of my background, I relate it to software development PM apps like Bugzilla or OnTime. Evernote has collaborative features, but it does not have this ability to identify who wrote what when.

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Some quotations to help you understand me

“The man who prays is the one who thinks that god has arranged matters all wrong, but who also thinks that he can instruct god how to put them right. Half-buried in the contradiction is the distressing idea that nobody is in charge, or nobody with any moral authority. The call to prayer is self-cancelling.” —Christopher Hitchens

“There are two governments: the one religious, by which the conscience is trained to piety and divine worship; the other civil, by which the individual is instructed in those duties which, as men and citizens, we are bound to perform. To these two forms are commonly given the not inappropriate names of spiritual and temporal jurisdiction, intimating that the former species has reference to the life of the soul, while the latter relates to matters of the present life, not only to food and clothing, but to the enacting of laws which require a man to live among his fellows purely honorably, and modestly. The former has its seat within the soul, the latter only regulates the external conduct. We may call the one the religious, the other the civil kingdom. Now, these two, as we have divided them, are always to be viewed apart from each other. Let us now return to human laws. If they are imposed for the purpose of forming a religious obligation, as if the observance of them was in itself necessary, we say that the restraint thus laid on the conscience is unlawful. Our consciences have not to do with men but with God only.” —John Calvin

“I think that if the data is overwhelming in favor, in favor of evolution, to deny that reality will make us a cult, some odd group that’s not really interacting with the real world.” —Dr. Bruce Waltke

“Properly read, the bible is the most potent force for atheism ever conceived.” —Isaac Asimov

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